Planting Snowdrops

Blooming flowers aren't usually a common sight during the dead of winter ' especially for locations with bitter, harsh outdoor environments; however, there are flowers that can handle such conditions.

Snowdrops (Galanthus) are hardy perennials that are tough enough to take on winter, but can also add beauty to snow-covered landscapes. They are usually planted in groups of 15 to 30, giving off a ground cover-like appearance.

Even though snowdrops typically bloom between January and March, fall is when they should be planted.

If you're considering adding snowdrops to your yard, here are some tips to help you get started:

Scouting

Since snowdrops prefer cooler conditions, it's best to plant them in an area of your yard that's well-drained and well-shaded, year-round. Some of the most common locations to plant snowdrops are near shrubs or at the base of trees.

It's also important to select a location where summer planting will not take place, as digging up soil to plant additional spring and summer annuals can harm snowdrop bulbs.

Timing

The best time to plant snowdrops is early fall. Bulbs should be planted shortly after they are purchased, when they are moist and freshly separated to ensure plant health and strength.

Prior to buying bulbs, check with your local nursery to see when snowdrops arrive so you can properly map out the planting timeline.

Planting

Once you've determined where you'll be planting your snowdrops, you'll want to loosen the soil and mix in compost for boosted nutrients necessary for growth.

After soil is prepped, dig holes about 5 inches deep and 3 inches apart, then drop your snowdrop bulbs into the holes pointed-end up and cover with soil. Next, deeply water the planting area to establish bulbs in the soil.

Waiting

Patience is key with snowdrops; these fall bulbs will take some time before they start to blossom ' especially if year-to-year winter weather patterns differ.

If you don't witness large flowers the first winter after planting, don't hit the panic button. Some snowdrops take a full year to become established.


The Dirt from Troy-Bilt®
October 2016